Programme at a glance

The latest developments in the field of transplantation

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Sunday 24 September
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MORNING:             SPECIALTY UPDATE SYMPOSIA

                               

11.20-14.30             SPECIAL SESSION: The coolest clinical trials in transplantation sponsored by the EU

13.00-14.30             Corporate plenary symposia

 

14:45-16:30             OPENING EVENT AND PLENARY SESSION 1 | BIG BANG TRANSPLANTATION

Welcome addresses by the Congress chairs, Josep Maria Grinyó, Barcelona, Spain and Stefan Schneeberger, Innsbruck, Austria

CREATORS: Maarten Naesens, Leuven, Belgium and Gabriel Oniscu, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

The session will take you on a journey from the origins of Transplantation to present day. Recent advances in science open the gate to extending human life, defying nature. However, we are also learning from nature how to extend the life of organs and the entire human body. On the brink of the biggest adventure of the human race, stepping on different planet, we face questions about the very essence of humanity

CHAIRS: Josep Maria Grinyó, Barcelona, Spain and Vassilios Papalois, London, United Kingdom

Lectures:

  • Current patient experience and viewpoint.
    Carole Lamarque, Antwerp, Belgium
  • Hibernation and preservation.
    Robert H.Henning, Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Near future: A glimpse into the on-going/near future of transplantation
    Gerald Brandacher, Baltimore, United States
  • KEYNOTE The human fate from a universal perspective - The race to Mars
    John Bradford, Atlanta, United States

 

16.45-18.15             Corporate parallel symposia                             

 

18.30-19.30             Brief oral sessions

                                e-Poster opening

 

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Monday 25 September
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07.30-09.00             EDUCATION TRACK 1: Histocompatibility: your worst nightmare?

CREATOR: Frans Claas, Leiden, The Netherlands

CHAIRS: Frans Claas, Leiden, The Netherlands and David Taube, London, United Kingdom

Lectures:

  • Application of Luminex assays before and after transplantation
    Christophe Legendre, Paris, France
  • From actual towards virtual crossmatches
    Craig Taylor, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • HLA epitope matching
    Sebastiaan Heidt, Leiden, The Netherlands
  • Hidden sensitization: the memory B cell repertoire
    Oriol Bestard, Barcelona, Spain

 

07.30-09.00             EDUCATION TRACK 2: Live donation

CREATORS: Paolo Muiesan, Birmingham, United Kingdom and Raj Thuraisingham, London, United Kingdom

CHAIRS: Paolo Muiesan, Birmingham, United Kingdom and Raj Thuraisingham, London, United Kingdom

Lectures:

  • Left lobe replacing right lobe in live liver donation
    Ki Hun Kim, Seoul, South Korea
  • Governance and near miss events in live liver donation
    Juan Carlos García-Valdecasas, Barcelona, Spain
  • Minor clinical abnormalities in kidney donors
    Rachel Hilton, London, United Kingdom
  • Teaching minimally-invasive live donor nephrectomy
    Lloyd Ratner, New York, United States

 

08.00-09.00             Full oral sessions

                                Brief oral sessions

 

09:10-10:40             STATE OF THE ART 1 | ORGAN PRESERVATION AND ENHANCEMENTS

CREATORS: Gabriel Oniscu, Edinburgh, United Kingdom and Jacques Pirenne, Leuven, Belgium

2017: A growing need for transplantation and changing demographics that challenge any potential increase in organ transplantation. Clinical efforts and research focus on making more organs function better and creating more organs for the ever-growing demand. The race is on: will it be organ reconditioning or creating more organs off the shelf? This session will discuss some of the recent developments that may make organ shortage a thing of the past

CHAIRS: Constantino Fondevila, Barcelona, Spain and Jacques Pirenne, Leuven, Belgium

Lectures :

  • Organ reconditioning should start in the donor
    Gabriel Oniscu, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Ex-situ organ reconditioning: living up to the promise?
    Peter Friend, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Origami based tissue engineering
    Nathaniel Hwang, Seoul, South Korea
  • Choice cuts: growing organs in alternative environments
    Pablo Juan Ross, Davis, United States

 

09:10-10:40             STATE OF THE ART 2 | MIX AND MATCH: THE RIGHT ORGAN FOR THE RIGHT RECIPIENT

CREATORS: Valentin Cuervas-Mons, Madrid, Spain and Eelco de Koning, Leiden, The Netherlands

The right organ for the right patient is a central theme in transplantation. To maintain good clinical transplantation outcome is an increasing challenge in light of both donors and recipients with more unfavourable characteristics that could negatively affect this outcome. In this session we will first focus on global aspects of donation and transplantation and subsequently zoom in on 3 categories of recipients that we commonly encounter in our transplantation clinics. Sergio Leone would name them: The immunized, The old and The diabetic            

CHAIRS: Valentin Cuervas-Mons, Madrid, Spain and Eelco de Koning, Leiden, The Netherlands

Lectures :

  • World Overview on Transplantation Activities (A report of the Global Observatory on Donation & Transplantation)
    Beatriz Mahillo, Madrid, Spain
  • The immunized patient
    Frans Claas, Leiden, The Netherlands
  • The old patient
    Uwe Heeman, Munich, Germany
  • The diabetic patient
    Raja Kandaswamy, Minneapolis, United States

 

09:10-10:40             STATE OF THE ART 3 | THE BIOMARKER PERSPECTIVE: PRIME TIME OR PERPETUAL PROMISE?

CREATORS: Oriol Bestard, Barcelona, Spain and Maarten Naesens, Leuven, Belgium

Personalised medicine seems the new Holy Grail in medicine. But is it? And what has been achieved in transplantation?  In this session, we discuss the experiences of large consortia that search for biomarkers in the field of transplantation. Biomarkers for non-invasive diagnosis of rejection, for guidance on immunosuppression and for patient risk stratification. In addition, we learn that the efforts to discover and validate innovative biomarkers are huge and that the pipeline towards clinical implementation is long. Finally, we look into the mirror and the crystal ball,  evaluating the achievements made to date and the promises for the future.

CHAIRS: Oriol Bestard, Barcelona, Spain and Alberto Sánchez-Fueyo, London, United Kingdom

Lectures :

  • BIOMARGIN - systems biology for non-invasive diagnosis of rejection
    Wilfried Gwinner, Hannover, Germany
  • BIO-DRIM - marker-assisted immunosuppression individualisation
    Petra Reinke, Berlin, Germany
  • CTOT - biomarkers for transplant risk stratification
    Peter Heeger, New York, United States
  • The biomarker verdict: prime time or perpetual promise?
    Dany Anglicheau, Paris, France

 

11.10-12.40             BIG BANG 1 | TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED  MEDICINE

CREATORS: Pietro Cippà, Zurich, Switzerland and Olivier Thaunat, Lyon, France

We are living in an fast moving age, where the convergence of rapidly developing technologies are enabling new capabilities with the potential to radically improve and disrupt our day to day life. In this session we invite you to have a glance into the crystal ball to see how the future of transplantation looks like. You will learn a CRISPR way to engineer the human genome and how we will soon operate patients from within thanks to nanorobot surgeons."

CHAIRS: Pietro Cippà, Zurich, Switzerland and Olivier Thaunat, Lyon, France

Lectures :

  • A CRISPR way to engineer the human genome
    Angelo Lombardo, Milan, Italy
  • Operating from within: nanorobotic surgery
    Speaker to be confirmed
  • KEYNOTE Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, La Jolla, USA
  • Ellen Roche, Cambridge, United States

 

11.10-12.40             Best abstract challenge

                                Full oral sessions

 

13.00-14.00             Corporate parallel lunch symposia

                                Surrogate Endpoints International Workshop

                                Brief oral sessions

                                Elevator Pitch sessions

 

14:05-15:35             PLENARY SESSION 2 | TRIALS AND TRIBULATIONS IN TRANSPLANTATION

CREATORS: Marc Dahlke, Regensburg, Germany and Alexandre Loupy, Paris, France

Some of the established frameworks and conventional approaches in transplantation are outdated and hinder further progress in the field: Endpoints such as BPAR may be less relevant in the modern era while surrogate endpoints e.g. for long term Ktx survival are lacking. We herein attempt to shake up your minds a bit and engage in a mind-set that challenges some of the things considered to be "true" or important. Let us rethink the relevance and value of established tools for promotion of progress in clinical science and face the need for change and the challenges that come with it. Welcome to a  session that will be rebellious and provocative but also constructive and productive.

CHAIRS: Bob Montgomery, New York, United States and Gabriel Oniscu, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Lectures :

  • What to do when randomized controlled trials stop working
    Alexandre Loupy, Paris, France
  • I can induce tolerance but nobody wants to believe me
    Alberto Sánchez-Fueyo, London, United Kingdom
  • Define Success in the 2017 Transplant World; A Path to happiness
    Flavio Vincenti, San Francisco, United States
  • KEYNOTE : Managing Change with Big Data.

 

16:00 -17:00            BIG BANG 2 | VALUE AND COSTS OF SCIENCE AND PATIENT CARE IN TRANSPLANTATION: THE UNWANTED TRUTH

CREATORS: Stefan Schneeberger, Innsbruck, Austria and Dorry Segev, Baltimore, United States

The idea of this session is to critically reflect on the value and cost relationship in transplantation – in reference to science, progress, quality of life, patient behaviour including compliance but also regulatory obligations such as working week regulations. The value of life and costs of suffering as well as the implications of money and patient but also physician behaviour are much debated issues in modern health care. We will touch on strategic thinking in research funding, the implementation from lab invention to successful enterprises and what can be learned from the free market. In this session, we aim to draw a modern picture of the actual circumstances in Health Care with respect to both the finances of a treatment, but also patient behaviour and their implications on quality of care. You will experience a different and fresh view on patient care in a rapidly changing environment.

CHAIRS: Stefan Schneeberger, Innsbruck, Austria and Dorry Segev, Baltimore, United States

Lectures :

  • The price for progress
    Wim Bens, Maastricht, The Netherlands
  • The changing circumstances in health care and their consequences
    Scott Halpern, Philadelphia, United States
  • The price for patients satisfaction
    Sheila Jowsey, Rochester, United States

 

16.00-17.00             Modern education

                                Brief oral sessions

 

16.00-18.00             Full oral sessions

                                               

17.00-18.00             Transplant campfire

                                The Devil's Advocate - Contradictory discussion of Basic Science

                                Brief oral sessions

 

18.00-19.30             Corporate Plenary Symposium

 

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Tuesday 26 September
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07.30-09.00             EDUCATION TRACK 3 : Above and below the diaphragm

CREATORS: Arne Neyrinck, Leuven, Belgium and Annemarie Weissenbacher, Oxford, United Kingdom

CHAIRS: Jim Egan, Dublin, Ireland and Annemarie Weissenbacher, Oxford, United Kingdom

Lectures :

  • Old and new listing criteria for  lung and heart transplantation
    John Dark, Newcastle, United Kingdom
  • Old and new listing criteria for liver, pancreas and intestinal transplantation
    Peter Friend, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • How do factors from above the diaphragm impact on the outcome of organ Tx below the diaphragm?
    Stephan Eschertzhuber, Innsbruck, Austria
  • Combined transplanted patients - Which organ drives the immunosuppressive regimen?
    Nassim Kamar, Toulouse, France

 

07.30-09.00             EDUCATION TRACK 4 : Pathophysiology and endpoints on tolerance

CREATORS: Mark Dahlke, Regensburg, Germany and Henri Leuvenink, Groningen, The Netherlands

CHAIRS: Cristina Cuturi, Nantes, France and Nina Pilat, Vienna, Austria

Lectures :

  • Clinical tolerance studies
    Megan Sykes, New York, United States
  • Clinical tolerance endpoints/biomarkers
    Robert Lechler, London, United Kingdom
  • Macrophages and the induction of tolerance
    Jordi Orchando, New York, United States
  • Treg inducing allograft tolerance in human
    Giovanna Lombardi, London, United Kingdom

 

08.00-09.00             Full oral sessions

                                Brief oral sessions

 

09:10 - 10:40           STATE OF THE ART 4 | NEW CONCEPTS IN TRANSPLANT INFECTIOUS DISEASES: MICROBIOTA, AND BEYOND

CREATORS: Marina Berenguer, Valencia, Spain and Nicolas Mueller, Zurich, Switzerland

New genetic tools have allowed an unprecedented insight into the composition of our microbiota, and virome. first we explore the known role of the virome and microbiota specifically in transplantation. Potential clinical applications are discussed. The new anti-HCV drugs have made eradication of HCV a realistic goal in virtually all patients. We learn about the impact on transplantation on an individual and epidemiological level. And finally, the immunomodulatory role of viruses in transplantation are often mentioned – but does this concept hold up? A critical appraisal of the concept of the indirect effects of viruses is presented. How important is a complete control of viral replication?

CHAIRS: Marisa Alegre and Marina Berenguer, Valencia, Spain

Lectures :

  • Transkingdom interplay - the complex interactive world of the microbiome
    Dave Wang, St. Louis, United States
  • Knowledge and clinical applications of microbiota in transplantation
    Frederick Bushman, Philadelphia, United States
  • Viruses and recipient immune response: relevant crosstalk in transplantation
    Oriol Manuel, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • The impact of HCV treatment on liver transplantation
    Michael R.Charlton, Salt Lake City, United States

 

09:10 - 10:40           STATE OF THE ART 5 | CELL THERAPY IN CLINICAL TRIALS

CREATORS: Marc Dahlke, Regensburg, Germany and Pietro Cippà, Zurich, Switzerland

Cell therapy offers great hope for being a suitable adjunct to conventional immunosuppression with all its downsights, however major issues emerged in the long translation process towards the clinic. How can technical and regulatory hurdles be overcome within a realistic time frame? Will cell therapy be commercially interesting and will its implementation relaunch solid organ transplantation? Experts share their experience and explain what we might expect from cell therapy for tomorrow and in 10 years.

CHAIRS: Marc Dahlke, Regensburg, Germany and Thomas Wekerle, Vienna, Austria

Lectures :

  • Technical and regulatory issues. From the idea to the clinical application
    Marlies Reinders, Leiden, The Netherlands
  • Sharing clinical experience. What can we learn from hematologists?
    Francesco Dazzi, London, United Kingdom
  • Translational studies. Why do we need cell therapy if we cannot avoid severe immunosuppression?
    Suzanne T. Ilstad, Louisville, United States
  • The future: Clinical applications of stem cells, transplantation vs. regeneration? Clinical applications of stem cells, transplantation vs. regeneration?
    Alan Trouson, Clayton, Australia

 

09:10 - 10:40           STATE OF THE ART 6 | ONE FOR ALL OR ALL FOR ONE; GETTING AWAY FROM PROTOCOLIZED MEDICINE

CREATORS: Georg Boehmig, Vienna, Austria and Nicolas Mueller, Zurich, Switzerland

The ultimate goal of transplantation is long-term survival with a well-functioning graft. Operationalization of post-transplant care with protocols based on evidence from clinical trials has had an important impact on the overall quality after transplantation. It is increasingly recognized though that the ‘one size fits all’ approach does not always optimally reflect the patient’s individual need. Hence, the concept of personalized medicine is on everyone's lips. This session aims to confront the reality by asking the following questions, focusing on four important topics in the field.

CHAIRS: Georg Boehmig, Vienna, Austria and Nicolas Mueller, Zurich, Switzerland

Lectures :

  • Is transplantation ready for systems medicine?
    Rainer Oberbauer, Vienna, Austria
  • Individualized antimicrobial prophylaxis
    Jay Alan Fishman, Boston, United States
  • Phenotypic diversity of rejection and allograft dyfunction
    Phil Halloran, Edmonton, Canada
  • Tailored immunosuppression
    Christian Hugo, Dresden, Germany

 

11.10-12.40             BIG BANG 3 | INNOVATION IN IMMUNOMEDICATION: THE MODERN PROMETHEUS

CREATORS: Josep Maria Grinyó, Barcelona, Spain and Olivier Thaunat, Lyon, France

Putting their steps in those of Dr Frankenstein, scientists have started stitching disparate biological pieces to create new therapeutic opportunities. Far from Sci-Fi fantasies, these therapeutic innovations have already shown promising results in the field of cancer therapy. Their potential to revolutionize solid organ transplantation will be scrutinized during this Big Bang session.

 

 

11.10-12.40             Asia leading the way

                                Full oral sessions

                                Elevator Pitch sessions

 

13.00-14.00             Corporate Parallel lunch Symposia

                                Brief oral sessions

 

13.00-14.00             Rising Stars on stage

  • Presentation fellowship Study Results 1
  • Presentation fellowship Study Results 2
  • TED Talk: ‘Life changing events’
  • TED Talk: ‘A very personal story on success and failure’

 

14:05-15:35             PLENARY SESSION  3 | INNOVATION UNDER PRESSURE: TRANSPLANT PATIENT CARE IN 2020

CREATORS: Marina Berenguer, Valencia, Spain and Antonio Roman, Barcelona, Spain

Health care is undergoing a fundamental change. While new fields in medicine are emerging and short-term results are satisfactory, long-term care of patients after transplantation is more complex and challanging then ever. While novel technologies may help to effectiverly monitor patients after transplantation, novel structures and business models are warranted to ensure optimal patient care and advancement of the field.

CHAIRS: John Forsythe, Edinburgh, United Kingdom and Christophe Legendre, Paris, France

Lectures :

  • Prospects and pushbacks in hand face uterus abdominal wall penile transplant and others
    Wei-Ping Andrew Lee, Baltimore, United States
  • Beyond survival: quality of life after transplantation
    Lianne Singer, Toronto, Canada
  • New tech for new patients: digital communication and self-monitoring
    Giral Magali, Nantes, France
  • KEYNOTE New models for patient care: wish for what you care for
    Marcel Levi, London, United Kingdom

 

16.00-17.00             BIG BANG 4 | AGEING AND IMMORTALITY

CREATORS: Maarten Naesens, Leuven, Belgium and Olivier Thaunat, Lyon, France

In this session, we discuss the changing demographics of donors and recipients, and the impact on transplantation (organ quality, ischemia-reperfusion injury and immunosenescence). Transplant allocation organisations are implementing age-matching in their allocation procedures. The benefits and the potential drawbacks of these important changes are discussed. In addition, the biology of ageing, and the concept of accelerated ageing after transplantation is covered in BB4, with illustrations of the great relevance of ageing for the future of patients and grafts. Finally, we evaluate innovative ways to halt or slow down these ageing processes, and discover the clues to immortality.

CHAIR : Maarten Naesens, Leuven, Belgium

Lectures:

  • Older graft, older recipients, young ideas
    Stefan Tullius, Boston, United States
  • Accelerated ageing after transplantation
    Peter Stenvinkel, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Halting aging: the science of rejuvenation
    Brian Kennedy, Novato, United States

 

16.00-17.00             The Devil's Advocate ( Clinical )

                                Brief oral sessions

 

17.00-18.30             Corporate Plenary/Parallel Symposium

                                Full oral sessions

 

18.30-19.30             ESOT General Assembly

                                Elevator Pitch sessions

                                Brief oral sessions

 

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Wednesday 27 September
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07.30-09.00             EDUCATION TRACK 5 : Infection diseases

CREATORS: Frederike Bemelman, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Marina Berenguer, Valencia, Spain

CHAIRS: Alain Le Moine, Brussels, Belgium and Frederike Bemelman, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Lectures:

  • Prophylaxis of infections in solid organ transplantation (including donor derived infections)
    Jay Alan Fishman, Boston, United States
  • Infectious diseases in the central nervous system of Solid Organ Transplant patients
    Peter Portegies, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Fungal and Yeast Infections in SOT patients
    José María Aguado, Madrid, Spain
  • Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation
    Oriol Manuel, Lausanne, Switzerland

 

07.30-09.00             EDUCATION TRACK 6 : Allograft phenotype and clinical implications

CREATORS: Maarten Naesens, Leuven, Belgium and Marlies Reinders, Leiden, The Netherlands

CHAIRS: Lorna Marson, Edinburgh, United Kingdom and Marlies Reinders, Leiden, The Netherlands

Lectures:

  • Allo-immune responses: what a clinician should know
    Frans Claas, Leiden, The Netherlands
  • Rejection phenotypes across organs: revisiting the basics
    Chris Bellamy, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • How to integrate complex histological phenotypes in routine clinical decision making?    
    Daniel Serón, Barcelona, Spain
  • Time to make computer-assisted instead of eminence-based decisions?
    Alexandre Loupy, Paris, France

 

08.00-09.00             Full oral sessions

                                Brief oral sessions

 

09:10 - 10:40           STATE OF THE ART 7 | DONOR MANAGEMENT 

CREATORS: Arne Neyrinck, Leuven, Belgium and Jacques Pirenne, Leuven, Belgium

The pre-requisite for successful transplantation is the recruitment of organs of acceptable quality in order to limit the mortality on the waiting list and to guarantee optimal short- and long-term outcome. During the last years, we have experienced a renewed interest in strategies to optimize donor management, especially since liberalization of donor criteria has been introduced within the field.  In this session, we want to address the question if we can still extend the potential donor pool. Therefore the focus will be directed towards recent innovative approaches and towards potential risk factors that might limit further expansion.  The session wants to involve all professionals involved, including anaesthesiologists, intensivists, nurses, coordinators and transplant physicians.

CHAIR : Arne Neyrinck, Leuven, Belgium

Lectures :

  • How controlled is my DCD?
    Sophie Van Cromphaut, Leuven, Belgium
  • Should I perfuse my donor?
    Simon Messer, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Tribulation in designing donor intervention studies
    Claus Niemann, San Francisco, United States
  • How clean is my donor?
    Margaret Hannan, Dublin, Ireland

 

09:10 - 10:40           STATE OF THE ART 8 | PUSHING THE BOUNDARIES IN LIVING DONATION

CREATORS: Frank Dor, London, United Kingdom and Gabriel Oniscu, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Live donation has become normal practice in many countries. The successful expansion of the acceptance criteria for live kidney donors is now challenged by emerging evidence for an increased relative risk for the development of renal failure on the long run. In this context it is even more important how transplant professionals provide tailor made information and risk assessments. How can we ensure that donors understand the potential risk? Do we have a good screening tool to assess potential psychological risk for live donors? Can we step away from standardized surgical approaches for live donor nephrectomy or is a tailor made approach more desirable? And one of the burning questions in liver transplantation currently is: Should living liver donor transplantation be advocated above deceased donor liver Tx, as is usually the case in kidney Tx ? This session focuses on the balance between Pushing the limits in the context of potential short and long-term complications.

CHAIR : Barış Akin, Ankara, Turkey

Lectures :

  • To be or not to be a donor?  (How can we make sure potential donors understand the risks?)
    Aisling Courtney, Belfast, Ireland
  • Psychosocial evaluation of live donors - the need for a tool to determine psychological risk
    Fabienne Dobbels, Leuven, Belgium
  • Tailor Made Live Donor Nephrectomy: a conversation between 2 surgeons
    Frank Dor, London, United Kingdom and Gabriel Oniscu, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Should live liver donor transplantation be advocated above deceased donor liver Tx?
    Yaman Tokat, Istanbul, Turkey

 

09:10 - 10:40           STATE OF THE ART 9 | CELLULAR INTERACTIONS IN REJECTION

CREATORS: Lorna Marson, Edinburgh, United Kingdom and Olivier Thaunat, Lyon, France

Transplant rejection involves a coordinated attack of the graft by the innate and the adaptive immune systems of the recipient. Although direct visualization of this complex cellular interplay, made possible by recent technological progresses, has greatly improved our understanding of rejection pathophysiology, it has also led to unexpected observations. Indeed, like in other chronic inflammatory conditions, organized lymphoid tissue develops within allografts. This session will provide an update on cellular interactions in rejection and will discuss whether intragraft tertiary lymphoid organs contribute to graft rejection and/or tolerance.

CHAIRS: Henri Leuvenink, Groningen, The Netherlands and Wilson Wong, London, United Kingdom

Lectures :

  • Visualizing cell traficking underlying allosensitization by two-photon microscopy
    Menna Clatworthy, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • T cell migration to vascularized transplants
    Fadi Lakkis, Pittsburgh, United States
  • Lymphoid neogenesis: a tribute to the travellers
    Nancy Ruddle, New Haven, United States
  • Intragraft tertiary lymphoid organs: friends and foes
    Olivier Thaunat, Lyon, France

 

11:00 - 13:00           PLENARY SESSION 4 | LEADERSHIP IN TRANSPLANTATION – Closing Event

CREATORS: Lorna Marson, Edinburgh, United Kingdom and Stefan Schneeberger, Innsbruck, Austria

Leadership is a key element in our professional lives, yet the attention to professionalism in this "sport" has not received much attention. Much of the potential in our professional environment could be mobilized by enhancing the understanding of the principles in modern leadership. In this final plenary session, which will be also a closing event celebration, you will hear from some great leaders from within and outside transplantation. They will discuss leadership styles and give their own stories of leadership. As per the tradition of the ESOT conference, you will also be presented with a summary often most exciting innovations that have been discussed during the Congress in this session.

CHAIRS: Thierry Berney, Geneva, Switzerland - ESOT CURRENT PRESIDENT and Stefan Schneeberger, Innsbruck, Austria - ESOT PRESIDENT ELECT

Lectures:

  • Clinical: What's hot!
    Dennis Hesselink, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
  • Basic Science: What's hot!
    Oriol Bestard, Barcelona, Spain
  • Leadership in transplantation!
    Dorry Lidor Segev, Baltimore, United States and Rob Montgomery, New York, United States
  • KEYNOTE Leadership
    Javier Solana, Madrid, Spain
  • Presidential address
    Stefan Schneeberger, Innsbruck, Austria